Traditions across Europe-an eTwinning project

“Science and technology revolutionize our lives, but memory, TRADITION and myth frame our response.” (Arthur Schlesinger Jr.)

Constitution of May 3, 1791 (Polish Constitution) May 3, 2008

Filed under: national holidays — ligregni @ 9:57 pm
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It was actually Europe’s first and the world’s second modern national constitution. It was adopted by Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth parliament and was to create a more democratic constitutional monarchy. The Constitution introduced political equality between townspeople and nobility and improved the situation of peasants – they got under protection of the government. Also, the Constitution abolished the liberum veto (any deputy could undo legislation passed by the parliament).

The neighbors of the Commonwealth were actually hostile to the act. That led to war in defense of the Constitution. The Commonwealth was defeated and the Second Partition of Polish-Lituanian Commonwealth took place but the Constitution has played an important role – it was a national inspiration, a national pride and a message of the idea of independence that can be passed to future generations and other countries.

May 3 could not be celebrated after the constitution was adopted (as a result of the Partition – see above) and during communism. A lof of Polish towns nowadays organise family festivities to celebrate this special day.

Gimnazjum nr 18, Poland

 

One Response to “Constitution of May 3, 1791 (Polish Constitution)”

  1. Jim Pappas Kowalski Says:

    Sparta got grain from Italy but the Athenians got grain from Scythia, which became Poland. The Scythes were heavily Hellenized and intermarried with the Greeks. The Russians mingled with Varangian Vikings and Mongol Tatars and became autocratic and helped the Turks and Arabs bastardize Greece and Greek Christianity Therefore the only true heirs left for Ancient Athenian Democratic Tradition abd Erudition are the Glorious Polish people.


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